BlogPrivate vs. Public Cloud Computing – Choosing the Model That’s Right for You

Cloud Computing Implementation

In a recent blog, we wrote about 8 factors to consider when choosing a cloud computing deployment option. To recap, they are:

  • Initial investment
  • Amount of data to store
  • Longevity of data to store
  • Required performance
  • Access patterns and locations
  • Security and confidentiality required
  • Service-level agreements
  • Availability of in-house technical resources

While a hybrid cloud combines the benefits of public and private cloud computing models, there may be times when a private cloud is required or when a public cloud is a better choice.

Private Cloud Computing

With a private cloud deployment, companies need to supply their own hardware. Depending on budget, this gives companies the flexibility to build a cloud using technologies and infrastructures that can suit their individual needs. Initial infrastructure investments are higher with a private cloud. However, leasing or buying the technology for a private cloud could be more cost-effective in the long run since operating costs in a private cloud drop significantly over time. A cloud economics analysis and audit can help determine whether that might be the case for you.

With a private cloud computing model, data security is likely stronger. You need strict protocols with either model, but in a private cloud, the data sits behind your firewall and outside of the public domain. If your industry requires strict data compliance, then a private cloud computing deployment is likely your best bet.

In addition, data availability is usually greater with a private cloud. Redundancies and backup solutions can be configured to suit your needs and access can be better managed and controlled. At the end of the day, reliability and risk are two important considerations depending on your data requirements.

Public Cloud Computing

Scalability is one factor that often sets a public cloud computing model apart from its private counterpart. If you require quick growth or experience fluctuations in data storage requirements or performance, then a public cloud deployment might be right for you.

That said, there’s a higher cost per-hour that becomes aggregated with additional computing resources. Scaling up can multiply your costs by a factor of two (or more), and there’s often a fixed level of CPU and RAM per performance category. The costs should be transparent, but they’re variable and subject to change at the whim of the provider.

When it comes to reliability and risk, you often have little control over where systems are located or how they’re built, and there’s little guarantee of uptime. While SLAs are offered beyond compensation, there’s little recourse for loss of data access, which can be crippling for many businesses. Be sure to weigh all your considerations!

Understanding your data storage needs thoroughly will help determine which cloud computing deployment model is best suited for you and your organization and allow you to chart a strategy for success. A good IT consultant can also be invaluable in making wise choices and be sure to consider some common use cases for a public cloud deployment.

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Sign Up for a Free Data Center AIOps Workshop

AIOps Strategy and IT Transformation

Talk to an automation expert who can help you make more informed choices as you develop your analytics strategy and transition your environment to a new model.

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About the Author

Dustin Smith

Dustin Smith, Chief Technologist

Throughout his twenty-five year career, Dustin Smith has specialized in designing enterprise architectural solutions. As the Chief Technologist at ASG, Dustin uses his advanced understanding of cloud compute models to help customers develop and align their cloud strategies with their business objectives. His master-level engineering knowledge spans storage, systems, and networking.