Blog8 Things to Consider When Choosing a Cloud Computing Deployment Option

Cloud Computing Implementation

Despite widespread adoption in most organizations, cloud computing solutions are still complex. Cloud storage solutions like Dropbox or Box are fairly straight-forward, but for organizations and enterprises, cloud computing goes way beyond point and click. For example, organizations must first determine what cloud deployment option is right for them.

Private Cloud Computing – To build a private cloud, you need to supply your own hardware. Your data will sit behind your corporate firewalls, so you’ll directly control and manage the amount of data exposure. When you need to scale your cloud, you add another server, and the architecture expands by adding performance and capacity. Private clouds are typically located on-premise or within the walls of your data center provider.

Public Cloud Computing – To use public cloud resources, you choose a public cloud service provider. The service providers manage the infrastructure and pool resources so you can scale on-demand, without the need to purchase additional hardware infrastructure. Since your data sits in a publicly exposed cloud, your data security depends on the service provider’s level of security and defenses. Public clouds are most often located off-premise.

Hybrid Cloud Computing – Hybrid clouds are a combination of private and public clouds, located both on and off-premise. Some data resides on a private cloud, while other data resides on public cloud resources. Cloud and data security depends on companies’ internal security controls and those of the cloud provider.

In an earlier blog, we touched on 10 considerations when using a public cloud provider. But in determining your cloud deployment needs, there are additional factors that need to be addressed. Here are 8 of them:

  1. Initial Investment – Each deployment option has initial investments that vary. Here’s a blog that can help you make sense of ROI when considering cloud computing solutions.
  2. Amount of Data – How much data are you planning on storing in the cloud? With a public cloud you’ll pay per GB, but with a private cloud you’ll need to purchase your resources.
  3. Longevity of Data – How long will you need to store your data? Are there industry requirements that dictate how long you need to hold on to data?
  4. Required Performance – What do you need your IT infrastructure to do and how well does it need to be done? If you’re in need of computing resources as a core, mission-critical business function, then each option needs to be weighed accordingly.
  5. Access Patterns and Locations – How global is your business? This can determine where you need your resources located for optimal performance.
  6. Security and Confidentiality –Cloud and data security vary tremendously across your deployment options, so be sure to understand what’s at stake.
  7. Service Level Agreements – How important is ‘uptime’ to your business operations? Amazon cloud outages affect a lot of businesses. What would an outage do to yours?
  8. In-House Technical Resources – Do you have the technical resources available in-house to operate and maintain your private cloud?

To learn more about how you can transition to the new cloud computing model, consider our Cloud Strategy and IT Transformation Workshop. It’s a collaborative, interactive discussion that will give you a better understanding of the marketplace and leave you with ideas on how you can integrate the cloud into your own environment.

You can also download our latest eBook – Understanding the Cloud—What You Need to Know Before Diving In.

Free eBook

Understanding the Cloud—What You Need to Know Before Diving In

Before choosing a public cloud provider, learn the top considerations and fundamental concepts of cloud computing.

Learn More

Free eBook

Understanding the Cloud—What You Need to Know Before Diving In

Before choosing a public cloud provider, learn the top considerations and fundamental concepts of cloud computing.

Learn More

About the Author

Dustin Smith

Dustin Smith, Chief Technologist

Throughout his twenty-five year career, Dustin Smith has specialized in designing enterprise architectural solutions. As the Chief Technologist at ASG, Dustin uses his advanced understanding of cloud compute models to help customers develop and align their cloud strategies with their business objectives. His master-level engineering knowledge spans storage, systems, and networking.